State of Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission, John A. Mastropietro, Chairman
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What to Do if You are Injured on the Job


Report your injury to your employer immediately.

Your employer should provide you with medical treatment and should file an "Employer's First Report of Occupational Injury or Illness" form with its workers’ compensation insurance carrier and with the Workers’ Compensation Commission.

Your delay in reporting your injury increases the chance that it may be disputed.

Get prompt medical attention.

Your employer should send you to the company medical facility, a walk-in clinic, a hospital, or a designated physician for your initial medical treatment, as soon as possible after you are injured. If your employer has a designated medical provider, you must accept such initial treatment.

(Your employer or your employer’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier may establish a medical care plan to provide medical treatment for workers’ compensation claimants.)

File an official claim as soon as possible.

Filing this “written notice of claim” puts your claim on record. A 30C Form is best for this purpose and is available from any District Office or the Workers’ Compensation Commission’s Education Services.

The statute of limitations for filing a compensation claim for an accidental injury is one year from the date of the injury, while for an occupational disease it is three years from the first manifestation of a symptom.

If your employer wants to dispute your claim, you must receive official written notice of a denial (describing the reason(s) for it) or your employer must begin making workers’ compensation payments “without prejudice” within 28 calendar days.

[NOTE: An official claim for workers' compensation benefits that YOU file is not the same as the "Employer's First Report of Occupational Injury or Illness" form that your employer must file. To ensure that you have met the statute of limitations for filing your claim, and to put your claim on record permanently to safeguard your eligibility for benefits, YOU must file an official claim and not rely on your employer's accident report.]

Contact your employer’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier, if you don’t receive a benefit check within two weeks of becoming disabled.

To start payments the insurance carrier needs the "Employer's First Report of Occupational Injury or Illness" form and a wage statement from your employer, as well as a medical report from your physician confirming that your injury is work-related and that you are disabled by it. The insurer also needs to know your federal tax filing status and the number of exemptions shown on your federal tax return.

If only the wage statement is missing, the carrier can usually send an advance payment until it comes in.


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State of Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission, John A. Mastropietro, Chairman
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State of Connecticut
Workers' Compensation Commission
Page last revised: November 8, 2001
Page URL: http://wcc.state.ct.us/gen-info/if-injured/todo.htm

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